View Post
Nov. 12 5×5 Indy finalists set

Nov. 12 5×5 Indy finalists set

On Thursday, Nov. 12, judges and audience members will award $10,000 to an idea for using art to strengthen community in Indianapolis at 5 x 5: Dream Indy. The event is the fourth of four 5×5 idea competitions this year, in which five finalists have five minutes and five slides each to pitch an idea. The event is presented by Big Car Collaborative, the University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community, and Joy’s House Day Adult Service, as part of the 2015 Spirit & Place Festival (whose theme is “Dream”).

The event takes place in the grounds of Big Car’s new Tube Factory artspace, at 1125 Cruft St. in Garfield Park. A team of judges selected five finalists from among 27 submissions. The five selected ideas address building neighborhood identity, crossing demographic boundaries, and building social capital:

presented by Danicia Malone and Tomm Roesch
Indiana is one of five states in the nation with no anti-hate crimes legislation. This public art project will combat microagressions with microaffections through an interactive typographic projection of text related to ethics and advocacy, and eight gramophones strategically positioned around the city that collect and project words of encouragement.

Open Music Indy: A Collaborative Concert Series
presented by Rob Funkhouser and Austin Senior
Open Music Indy is a concert series that would gather musicians (composers, songwriters, performers) from different Indianapolis communities to create new music and perform it free to the public. Collaborations would be designed to join audiences and artists that would not normally listen or perform together. The concerts would happen in all-ages public spaces and be used as a tool to foster relationships between musicians and music lovers of all kinds and to eliminate any perceived barriers, cultural, demographic, or otherwise, between them.

Neighborhood Stories
presented by Bob Sander and Alysah Rice
Neighborhood Stories connects Near Eastside residents, young and old, through storytelling and illustration. Visual artist Emily Kennerk will design a “Reader’s Chair,” a public artwork, to mark the site of monthly reading events, where community members can gather to share stories about their neighborhood, across generations. Workshops, sponsored by Arts for Learning, will be held at area schools for students to create books based on the stories collected and their own dreams for the community.

A Place to Call Home: Saint Clair Place and Neighborhood Identity
presented by Lukas Schooler and Beverly Roche
Through neighbor-driven interviews and tailored public workshops, NoExit Performance would work with youth in the Saint Clair Place neighborhood to create a unifying historic and/or social narrative for their neighborhood through interviews with residents. NoExit Performance and neighbors will devise a series of short performances that will debut at the annual Saint Clair Place Parade.

The Secret of Life Society
presented by Christopher M. Dance and Chad Hankins
The Secret of Life Society is a series of figurative public monuments depicting current community residents, selected through a voting process. The sculptures would include benches and information about the unique place where the monuments are located. The aim is to inspire hope through creating value and interest in public spaces and individual champions of neighborhoods.

Funds for 5×5 come from the Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), the Efroymson Family Fund, the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation and Lilly Endowment Inc. The goal is to stimulate grassroots innovation in Indianapolis. This is the third year of the 5×5 program, in which $110,000 has been granted to 11 creative ideas.

At the Nov. 12 competition event, one idea will get $10,000 and the other four will receive $500. The panel of judges will select the best idea based on viability, community impact, creativity, intergenerational appeal. The audience vote counts as well.

The event is from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. and is free, with food and drink available for purchase. An RSVP is required.

View Post
Big Car lands two major grants

Big Car lands two major grants

Two Indianapolis-based foundations recently announced major gifts to Big Car Collaborative for our Garfield Park Creative Community initiative. Our artist-led non-profit will use the funds to renovate and occupy two formerly vacant buildings in Garfield Park as community art spaces to leverage cultural and economic revitalization of the near southside neighborhood.

A $250,000 contribution from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation will be used for renovation and furnishing of The Tube Factory artspace (above after 2015 Lilly Day of Service) at 1125 Cruft St., and Listen Hear, at 2620 S. Shelby St. A two-year $125,000 grant from the Nina Mason Pullman Charitable Trust will be used for staffing and programming when the two spaces open in early 2016.

Tube Factory is Big Car’s new permanent long-term home base featuring community gathering space, contemporary art exhibition area, and a cooperative workshop. Listen Hear is a venue for sound art and community radio, with a mini-laundromat and retail offerings. The Garfield Park Creative Community will also include affordable artist housing and art projects throughout the neighborhood in its next phase.

“We’re thrilled about these two major gifts and the impact this will have on our community,” executive director Jim Walker said. “The Tube Factory will be an anchor for a neighborhood full of art experiences. And it will give us a home base for placemaking and socially engaged projects around the city and beyond.”

The Allen Whitehill Clowes and Pulliam Trust grants add to the almost $800,000 already raised toward the $1.5 million goal. Supporters include a Community Development Block Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development via the City of Indianapolis Department of Metropolitan Development ($466,000), the Efroymson Family Fund ($150,000), Lilly Endowment, Inc. ($50,000); Christel DeHaan Family Foundation ($35,000); Indianapolis LISC ($20,000), Howard Schrott and Diana Mutz, Ursula David, The Madeira Fund, The Nicholas H. Noyes Jr. Memorial Foundation ($10,000 each), and the Arthur Jordan Foundation ($2,500), as well as a major in-kind contribution from Blackline, the lead architect firm on the Tube Factory project. Riley Area Development Corporation is a key partner in the Garfield Park project as well.

Additionally, the Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP) invested $75,000 in Big Car and Riley Area Development’s housing initiative to refurbish vacant and neglected properties on Cruft Street as affordable live and work homes for artists who work with the public.

With Big Car owning its buildings, the Shelby Street corridor in the Garfield Park neighborhood is the permanent home and area of focus for the organization. Big Car works as an artist team embedded in Indianapolis neighborhoods to activate public space, engage artists and residents, and help transform the built environment as part a project called Garfield Park Creative Community. The goal is to make art and creativity integral to the culture of the neighborhood.